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Ever Heard Of Piebaldism?

Ever Heard Of Piebaldism? image

So, I had an assignment to write anything health and I was going to write on the “Ear wax”. Believe me I had ready, until a day back when out of boredom I was going through my Instagram feeds and I bumped into the post picture. The moment I saw this picture on the post I was stunned, literally so much beauty in one photograph. And my curiosity grew even more to know what “piebaldism” was, and so the birth of this post. I guess we all need a brief education on piebaldism.

 

What Is Piebaldism?

 

First off, Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant trait characterized by the congenital absence of melanocytes in affected areas of the skin and hair. A white forelock of hair, often triangular in shape, may be the only manifestation, or both the hair and the underlying forehead may be involved.

The eyebrows and the eyelashes may be affected. Irregularly shaped white patches may be observed on the face, trunk and the extremes will include a symmetrical distribution. Basically, islands of hyperpigemtation are present within and at the border of depigmented areas. It may also be known as PBT and Piebald trait.

 

Frequency

The prevalence of piebaldism is unknown, which is there is no statistical data proven on the occurrence of piebaldism.

Genetic changes

Piebaldism can be caused by mutations in the KIT and SNAI2 genes. However, piebaldism may also be feature of other conditions:

  • Waardenburg syndrome
  • Vitiligo
  • Piebald ( in animals )

Inheritance pattern: Piebaldism is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern; this means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the disorder.

Treatment & Management

  • Diagnostic Tests
  • Drug Therapy
  • Surgery and Rehabilitation
  • Genetic Counselling
  • Palliative Care

Quite an education I must say, but at the end of the day it pays to know. I wouldn’t want us to rely solely on this post for an education on Piebaldism, and its other related disorder. We should also look it up and read more on it considering the fact that this information shouldn’t be used as a substitute for professional medical advice but as enlightenment.

People with piebaldism, vitiligo or waardenburg syndrome shouldn’t have a stigma on them. I guess it’s human to be a little worried, but that shouldn’t turn to pity. I feel they deserve the same amount of love given to people without the disorder. They are even more beautiful with their disorder, there’s enough love in the air to share, so let’s not be biased or ignorant. Understanding that no one is perfect, we all having our own fault and are beautiful in our unique ways.

 



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