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How The Chibok Girls Have Raised $2.5Billion For Girl Child Education

How The Chibok Girls Have Raised $2.5Billion For Girl Child Education image

Yesterday made it 2 years since the kidnapping of over 200 girls from a Government secondary school in Chibok, Nigeria. Although it was an event we wish didn’t happen, it has prompted the world to take female education a lot more seriously.

The first lady of the United States, or FLOTUS as some say, Michelle Obama has called for the education of every girl child during the Let Girls Learn event in the World Bank Group-IMF Spring Meetings.

The call was well received, alongside a commitment from the World Bank Group to invest $2.5 billion on the education of the girl-child – an amount that will be spent during a 5 year period on education projects that directly benefit adolescent girls, whose empowerment is central to the Bank Group’s development efforts.

The announcement, made at the Let Girls Learn event during the World Bank Group-IMF Spring Meetings, was followed by a call to action from the First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama, urging key policymakers and influencers from around the world to commit to urgent action in support of adolescent girls.

“It’s an expression of our belief in the power of education to transform the lives and prospects of millions of girls worldwide — as well as the prospects of their families, their communities and, of course, their countries,” FLOTUS said.

“I’m very excited to join the First Lady in announcing this major boost in funding for adolescent girls’ education,” said World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim. “Empowering and educating adolescent girls is one of the best ways to stop poverty from being passed from generation to generation, and can be transformational for entire societies. This increased funding will help provide countries, especially in regions like Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, with the tools to expand access to quality education so that all adolescent girls can go to school and reach their full potential.”

Obama said the drive to educate all girls is not just about resources, but about whether “we truly believe that girls are worth educating in the first place. And that’s where this issue becomes personal for me...When I travel the world and I meet girls who are so bright and so hungry to go to school, I see myself in these girls. I see my daughters in these girls.”

“Make no mistake about it. These girls are our girls. Every last one of them. These girls are our responsibility.”


The event was held on the two-year anniversary of the abduction of 200 Nigerian schoolgirls by the terrorist group Boko Haram.

 



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